Frequent question: Do just giving donations go straight to the charity?

If you’re donating to a friend, successful donations will instantly appear on the Fundraising Page. … If you have donated directly to a charity page, your donation may not always show on their homepage, but rest assured that funds have definitely been sent to them and they can view this if they have access to reports.

Does JustGiving take money straight away?

Everything you need to know: Funds are available to withdraw 14 days after launching your page. To withdraw what you’ve raised so far, all you need to do is head to the ‘Funds’ tab on your Page. It takes 6-10 working days for the funds to reach you after requesting a withdrawal.

What percentage does JustGiving take from donations?

JustGiving charges charities a 5% Gift Aid reclaim and processing fee, but this is optional and charities can choose to claim Gift Aid themselves. It also charges a payment processing fee, set at 1.9% + £0.20. JustGiving states that this accounts for the varying costs of processing different payment types.

Is JustGiving just for charities?

If you’ve got a charitable registration number or a Gift Aid number, you can join JustGiving. So that includes charities, schools, churches, trusts, Community Amateur Sports Clubs (CASCs) and Girlguiding units (which includes Rainbows, Brownies and Guides).

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Your question: How do you get volunteers to show up?

How long does it take to receive money from JustGiving?

We’re not able to make any guarantees as to exactly when funds will be received, however it typically take 6-10 working days for funds to reach your account once you’ve requested a withdrawal, or once your page has closed.

What happens to JustGiving money?

If your charity is based in the UK we automatically transfer donations to the chosen charity on a weekly basis (or, if the total donated to that particular charity on JustGiving is £50 or less, we wait until the end of the month). There’s nothing you need to do.

How does JustGiving make money?

We have done away with a 5% fee taken from the donation, instead we are now asking donors to add a small tip on top of their donation to keep us running and improving. The only fee deducted from the donation is a card processing that is standard for each transaction made through our site.

Which is better JustGiving or Virgin Money Giving?

Conclusion – It seems that Virgin Money Giving are delivering an equal service with a better deal for charities, setting itself as a major competitor to Just Giving. This year, Virgin Money Giving clocked up donations for the London Marathon to the value of £13.88 million up two thirds on the previous year.

Which fundraising site has lowest fees?

When comparing crowdfunding websites, Bonfire charges the lowest out of all of the ones listed. There aren’t any platform fees. The only fee they ever collect is an 8% processing fee per additional donation (reduced to an incredible 3.5% for verified nonprofits). Fundly has the next lowest platform fee of 4.9%.

THIS IS IMPORTANT:  Are donations to overseas charities tax deductible?

Is there a problem with JustGiving?

There can be fees added to or taken from the money you give, and the charities themselves could be faced with charges just for being listed on the platform. Among the worst is the most popular – Just Giving. This is the only one of the major platforms that isn’t non-profit.

Does JustGiving make a profit?

Profits at the online fundraising platform JustGiving more than doubled in 2019 after it recorded double digit growth in charity sign-ups, latest figures show. The company’s accounts for 2019 show it recorded a profit of nearly £9.4m, a £5.6m increase on the previous year.

Can companies use JustGiving?

At this time, company fundraising profiles are only available to corporate businesses. You can still use JustGiving to fundraise though, here are your options: Set up a single JustGiving fundraising page here, and ensure that you put your school or organisation’s name in the First Name and Last Name field.

Charity Blog